Monday, September 30, 2019

Angel Food Cake

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake RecipesAngel food cake uses a heck of a lot of egg whites.  Twelve egg whites, to be exact.  Which is a lot, so it's not a cake that I bake that often, because when I do have extra egg whites, it's usually only 2-3 at a time.  I used to add those to scrambled eggs the next morning, but what I do now is freeze them in a labeled freezer bag, and then when I have enough, I make my favorite Buttermilk Birthday Cake, a white cake that calls for six egg whites.  But I'd accumulated enough for an angel food cake, and since I've never published an angel food cake on my blog, I thought it was about time.

Let's talk first about what recipes you might bake or cook that use just egg yolks, so that you end up with extra egg whites.  Custard or pudding, cream pies, lemon bars, lemon curd, ice cream, hollandaise sauce, spaghetti carbonara, steak tartare, homemade mayonnaise or aioli, creme brulee, bread pudding, pastry dough and Caesar salad dressing, to name a few.

And on the flip side of that, besides the obvious use of egg whites in white cake, meringue or pavlova, there are French macarons, souffles, candied nuts, royal icing, coconut macaroons, baked fries or onion rings (I've read they add a crispier texture, but haven't personally tried it yet) or smoothies.  Yes, I love making a frozen banana smoothie with either pasteurized raw whole eggs or egg whites, frozen banana, ice, cinnamon, a handful of almonds, vanilla extract and unsweetened almond milk.  It's delicious.  And there are countless other uses for those whites, as well.

So, if you've been throwing away leftover yolks or whites, shame on you, and send them to me next time.  I hate wasting ingredients and will always find a way to use them.




Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes




But, back to angel food cake.  This fluffy, light-as-a-cloud sponge cake is a classic, and really not difficult to make at all.  Egg whites are whipped with cream of tartar (for stability) and a pinch of salt, and then sugar is added to the whites and whipped until the meringue forms soft billowy peaks, similar to whipped cream.  You can add any flavor that you like - I flavored mine with vanilla and a little almond extract, but other common flavors are lemon, orange or coconut.  And finally, sifted cake flour is folded into the light and airy batter.

Angel food cakes are baked at a slightly lower temperature than other cakes - 325 F - and a perfectly baked angel food cake should have a light golden brown (not burnt or deep brown) crust with a pure white, fluffy spongy cake crumb inside.

Since angel food cakes don't contain fat of any kind (no eggs, butter, oil or milk), they are sweet cakes that are incredibly light, and it's easy to eat a large slice without feeling full.  They're wonderful with fruit and freshly whipped cream, either unsweetened or just with the slightest touch of sugar in the cream.  I served mine with peach compote from our own home-grown peaches this summer.




Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes

Angel Food Cake, White Cake, High Altitude Angel Food Cake, White Cake Recipe, Egg White Recipes, Fat Free Cake Recipes




High Altitude Angel Food Cake
printable
  • 12 large egg whites (1 1/2 cups), room temperature
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 3/4 teaspoons coarse Kosher salt
  • 1 1/3 cups super-fine granulated sugar (see note)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 1/3 cups cake flour, sifted
Notes.
  1. For "super-fine" granulated sugar, you can grind regular granulated sugar in a food processor or Ninja for one minute to grind it up more finely, which helps it dissolve more easily into the egg whites.  Powdered sugar is not a suitable replacement, as it is too fine.
  2. If you like, omit the almond extract and just use two teaspoons of vanilla extract instead.  Angel food cakes can also be flavored with orange, lemon or coconut extracts.
  3. The cream of tartar is necessary to stabilize the whipped egg whites and provide structure to the cake.
  4. Fresh or frozen egg whites can be used.  Some say that fresh yield the best results, however, I almost always find myself with excess egg whites that I freeze for later use, until I have enough for a white cake, and I use those for my cakes, so I can say with confidence that frozen and thawed egg whites work excellently.
  5. You'll need a 9-inch tube pan, ungreased, preferably one with a removable bottom.  The removable bottom is not a must (mine does not have this feature), but you do have to work a little harder to get the cake out without it.  The pan must be ungreased, because the meringue will not be able to rise if the sides of the pan are slippery.  This cake cannot be made in a bundt pan, because it would be impossible to remove cleanly.

Preheat the oven to 325.

In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites, cream of tartar and salt on medium speed for several minutes until foamy.

With the mixer still running, gradually sprinkle in the sugar, and continue to whip until the meringue forms thick, soft, billowy peaks that still fall over, similar to softly whipped cream.  You should not whip the meringue to stiff peaks, or the structure of the cake will weaken, and could collapse while baking.  Once your meringue has reached soft peaks, add the extracts and whip briefly to combine.

Add the sifted cake flour, 1/3 cup at a time, gently folding the flour into the meringue with a spatula until no more flour streaks remain, until you've folded in all the flour.

Spoon the batter into your ungreased tube pan and smooth out the top.  Bake for about 40 minutes, until a cake tester comes out clean.

Immediately invert the pan onto a wire rack and cool the cake upside down for several hours, until completely cooled.  Set the pan upright.  Run a sharp knife around the outside edge and around the tube in the middle to loosen the cake, then carefully coax the cake out of the pan (this step is much easier if your pan has a removable bottom).

Using a sharp serrated knife, cut the cake into slices using a back-and-forth sawing motion.  Serve with whipped cream and fresh fruit.

Recipe from Curly Girl Kitchen

1 comment :

  1. Very pretty and simple. I love your recipes. Its amazing at what a mother can do with so much on her plate. But when it is time to sit and relax this would be the best cake! You are appreciated for all that you do.

    ReplyDelete

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