Monday, July 22, 2019

Peaches and Cream Cake

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating IdeasFor my birthday last week, the best present was my husband taking two days off work to spend with us.  I was surprised to wake up Thursday morning to the smell of bacon, and after getting my boys up and dressed and downstairs, there were presents and blueberry pancakes waiting.

"It's a birthday party!" my two-and-a-half-year-old exclaimed, upon seeing the wrapped presents.  He eagerly ate his pancake, and couldn't wait to help me open presents, which included a new double waffle maker and a couple of baking books.

I've had a few cakes on my list of cakes to bake this summer, but decided on this Peaches and Cream Cake for my birthday, since peaches are so wonderful this month.  Starting with a fluffy, white buttermilk cake, I filled the cake layers with fresh peach compote, lightly spiced with ginger.  Instead of a rich buttercream, I opted for a light, subtly sweetened mascarpone whipped cream frosting.

This is a cake that gets better every day, as it soaks up the moisture from the peaches and the whipped cream.  After cutting the first piece, I realized I was a bit too conservative with the peach filling - in not wanting it to leak out the sides, I didn't use quite enough, and really should have spread the filling all the way to the edges.  Aesthetically, more filling would have looked nicer, not to mention getting more peach compote into each slice is definitely desirable, because it tasted fantastic.

The mascarpone whipped cream frosting is a nice change from buttercream, and perfectly complements the fruit filling and the vanilla buttermilk cake.  It's light and refreshing, cool and creamy, and everything a summer cake should be.  The leftover whipped cream frosting is also great on pretty much anything.  Spooned onto a warm fruit crisp or crumble, a simple dark chocolate cake, layered into a trifle, served on waffles (which we did a few days later)... the possibilities are endless.  And for an easy, but dramatic decoration, I cut a small clipping from our peach tree to garnish a whole peach on top.




Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas

Peaches and Cream Cake, Peach Cake, White Velvet Cake, Buttermilk Birthday Cake, Cake Decorating Ideas



Baking Notes and FAQs:


  1. As with everything I bake, my cakes are baked at high altitude (I live in Denver), and to achieve your own perfect results, you may need to make a few slight adjustments if you live at a lower altitude or sea level.  Please read this post and this post for all of my baking FAQs.  There are many articles online that can offer advice on how to adjust your flour, sugar and leavening for various altitudes.
  2. As noted in the recipe below, it's important for the egg whites, buttermilk and butter to be at room temperature.
  3. Cake flour is best in this cake.  It makes a much lighter cake than all-purpose flour does.  Be sure to sift the cake flour after measuring.
  4. Note that pictured here is 1/2 the recipe, baked in 6-inch cake pans, but the full recipe is written below for standard 8-inch layers.
  5. The mascarpone whipped cream frosting is very stable, and will not deflate or turn watery, but the cake should be kept in the refrigerator to keep the frosting chilled.  However, cake is always best eaten at room temperature.  Cold from the fridge, the cake will be more firm, but if allowed to warm up to room temperature for several hours before serving, it will be very soft, moist and luscious.  You can also microwave a cold slice of cake on low power to warm it up, and it will be amazing.  This cake is fantastic for days afterwards, and stays very moist as it soaks up the compote and the cream.
     



Peaches and Cream Cake
printable


Peach Compote.
  • 3 ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
In a saucepan, combine the peaches, lemon juice, sugar and ginger.  Over medium heat, bring the peaches to a simmer.  Continue to simmer until the fruit begins to break down, and the liquid is syrupy.  Mash the fruit slightly for a chunky compote.  Cool completely.


White Velvet Buttermilk Cake.
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 6 egg whites, room temperature
  • 2 1/2 cups buttermilk, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract
  • 3 1/4 cups cake flour, sifted
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Preheat the oven to 350 and grease four 8-inch round cake pans.  Sift the flour together with the baking powder and salt and set aside.

In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar for 10-12 minutes, scraping the bowl down every few minutes, until very light and fluffy and pale in color.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg whites, buttermilk and vanilla, just to combine.  With the mixer on low, add the wet ingredients to the butter/sugar mixture and mix for 1 minute to combine; it will look lumpy/curdled.  Add the flour, baking powder and salt to the mixture, mix on low for 30 seconds, and then beat on medium speed for 2 minutes for a light and airy batter.

Divide the batter between the cake pans.  Bake for 22-25 minutes until the centers are done, then set the pans on a wire rack, cover loosely with a clean kitchen towel and cool completely.


Mascarpone Whipped Cream Frosting.
  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
With an electric mixer (stand or hand mixer), beat the mascarpone cheese and powdered sugar until smooth.  Gradually stream in the cream, and the vanilla bean paste, and beat until soft, thick, fluffy peaks form that will hold their shape.


Assembly.
Place one of the cooled cakes on a cake board or cake pedestal.  Spoon some of the mascarpone whipped cream into a piping bag and snip off the end.  Pipe a "dam" of cream around the edge of the cake.  Spoon some of the peach compote onto the cake, enough for a thick layer, and spread it out to the edge to fill the space inside the dam of cream.  Repeat the process with the second and third layers of cake; you may not use all the peach compote.  Top with the fourth layer of cake, and frost all over with the mascarpone whipped cream.  Refrigerate immediately to let the whipped frosting firm up a bit.

This cake should be kept in the refrigerator to keep the mascarpone whipped cream chilled.  However, it's best eaten at room temperature.  Cold from the fridge, the cake will be more firm, but if allowed to warm up to room temperature for several hours before serving, it will be very soft, moist and luscious.  You can also microwave a cold slice of cake on low power to warm it up, and it will be amazing.  This cake is fantastic for days afterwards, and stays very moist as it soaks up the compote and the cream.

Recipe from Curly Girl Kitchen

3 comments :

  1. Wow, this cake.. Looks amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This cake looks delicious. I love peaches and we have some that are so good right now. I live at 3000Ft in NC I think your recipe as written would work don't you? I read the article with the link you gave and there isn't much difference except the baking powder should I decrease your amount or leave it as written. Want to try the white velvet cake haven't made it yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm at 5,000 feet, so you might try the recipe as written first, and then make some slight adjustments if you feel like it's needed.

      Delete

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